Fan-to-Fan Customer Support with Douglas Kramon

Fan-to-Fan Customer Support with Douglas Kramon TW

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In this episode of the Customer Service Secrets Podcast, Gabe Larsen is joined by Douglas Kramon, Senior Director of Fan Support & Customer Care Operations at ESPN, to discuss how customer care drives customer experience. ESPN is a world renowned sports network with an unmatched customer care system. Learn how Douglas has become so successful in customer relations by listening to the podcast below.

Fan Support

The Customer Care Operations team at ESPN has transformed the world of customer experience by creating a more empathetic relationship between the agent and the customer. By doing so, not only have they improved customer experiences, but they have made room for fan-to-fan sports discussion. The concept of the “fan” was created as a nickname for customers at ESPN to make a more relatable and human connection to the agents. Douglas states, “But deep down, when you peel that layer of the onion back, you’re speaking to a fan just like you and they’re more likely to appreciate the conversation and remain an ESPN fan if there is a human element to that.” Douglas talks about how everyone in the Fan Support department is a big sports fan and because of this, they are better able to have constructive conversations when customers reach out to ESPN Fan Support.

Improving Brand Experience During COVID-19

For many fans, sports are memories. With this in mind, Douglas’ team knows that sports bring people together and many are missing that fan-to-fan interaction. They want to keep the sports memories alive, especially during COVID-19 when live sporting events have decreased. To do this, Douglas’ team is actively searching for ways to improve the ESPN sport experience all while balancing business and working from home during a pandemic. As Douglas mentions, “Sports are all about emotion and passion and when we talk sports or fans talk sports, it’s dialogue, it’s discussion, it’s debate.” While live sporting events are minimal, his team is working to replace the experience with engaging content such as a new docuseries called The Last Dance. Continuing to better the fan experience with more interesting content, contacting through SMS, live messaging, and human interaction, Douglas’ team has seen a large increase in C-SAT.

Three Ways to Keep Agents Happy and Thriving

At ESPN, not only is it important to keep the fans happy, it’s also important to keep the Fan Support agents happy. Douglas has figured out three elements that help his team thrive in a fast paced environment: workspace, collaboration, and nutrition. He hopes to harbor a motivating workspace where daily collaboration welcomes insightful communication. In connection with the nutrition concept, Douglas talks about how his agents have families and lives outside of the work environment and he emphasizes the importance of home life. He says:

So you had a great C-SAT. You’re going to get a family size pizza arriving at your door with a little note from ESPN saying, ‘Thank you for doing what you are doing.’ With the C-SAT review directly below it and letting them know we appreciate them. That means they’re more likely to go to a comfortable workspace that they’ve set up for themselves, that they’re collaborating with others as if they’re in the center and they’re feeling good that we appreciate them.

To Douglas, happy agents are a prerequisite to happy fans and small acts make a big difference in agent and fan morale.

To learn more about how customer care drives customer experience, check out the Customer Service Secrets podcast episode below, and be sure to subscribe for new episodes each Thursday.

 

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Full Episode Transcript:

Fan-to-Fan Customer Support with Douglas Kramon

Intro Voice: (00:04)
You’re listening to the customer service secrets podcast by Kustomer.

Gabe Larsen : (00:11)
All right, welcome everybody. We’re excited to jump in. We’re going to be talking about customer care driving customer experience, and to do that, we brought on Douglas Kramon. He’s currently the senior director of fan support and customer care operations at ESPN. Douglas, we appreciate you joining. How are ya?

Douglas Kramon: (00:30)
Good Gabe. Thank you so much for having me.

Gabe Larsen : (00:33)
Yeah, I think this will be fun. I mean, you’ve got a real interesting background. Obviously the company you’re working at, a lot of different changes going on there, and I want to jump into some of the ways you’ve managed around that. Still trying to drive those customers to be excited and passionate about a brand that I think really has kind of that passion innately in it. Before we do though, tell us just a little bit about yourself, your background, and then we can kind of jump in.

Douglas Kramon: (01:02)
Sure. My background is obviously when you go to college for Native American archeology and cultural anthropology, it’s natural to land at the worldwide leader of sports. That’s just what you do. It just happened. And needless to say, it’s been a wonderful time at ESPN. But, through my time post college, it’s really all been about customer experience and identifying the opportunities to improve the brand experience with the customer and what I will refer to with ESPN, we call the “fan.” ESPN is a Disney organization and so we have some serious brand prestige to try to maintain and we’re dealing with sports fans. Sports are all about emotion and passion and when we talk sports or fans talk sports, it’s dialogue, it’s discussion, it’s debate. So a lot of what I do is to make sure in my teams, the passion of sport or the passion that spans out for sport is brought closer to what they want to see.

Gabe Larsen : (02:21)
I love that.

Douglas Kramon: (02:21)
So we’re excited about that. And times have changed a little bit right now as we’re dealing with COVID-19, but that challenge still exists.

Gabe Larsen : (02:30)
Amen. Amen. So let’s get into that part of it. I mean, obviously, as you think about your current environment, it’s all about live – live sports, live everything. And that’s one of the things that drives the passion I think for the brand specifically, thinking about some of the sports ideas. Although on the Disney side, as you said, right? A lot of live interaction there, theme parks, et cetera. If you can just kind of paint the picture as to how you’re viewing it with all the changes that have gone on. Like what’s kind of going through your mind from a, “Holy smokes, the world has kind of turned and now I find myself in a very precarious place?”

Douglas Kramon: (03:14)
Yeah. It’s an excellent question. You know, going into this early to mid-March, I’m ramping up my care team to provide support for millions upon millions of college, NCAA tournaments, challenge players, looking for a college tournament. And then directly following that the beginning of major league baseball and fantasy baseball and suddenly like that, it’s all gone. So you suddenly have an opportunity and you’re ramped up accordingly for one of the most exciting months, if you will, in sports and then it just vanishes. So the live sport experience worldwide has vanished before our eyes.

Gabe Larsen : (03:59)
Man, when that NCA turned, when the big dance got canceled, I felt that one personally, because there’s sports that – I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to interrupt but I’m so passionate about this. Some of the sports, golf pro stuff, but man to see those kids who this is so important to them. They’re seniors. They’re going to the big dance, a lot of them for the first time and those pictures were just heartbreaking to see.

Douglas Kramon: (04:27)
And that’s the emotion of live sport? Is it not?

Gabe Larsen : (04:29)
It is.

Douglas Kramon: (04:29)
So knowing that, it’s disappeared and our fans feel that. It’s as if something has been ripped out of them in an incredibly difficult and challenging time already with what’s going on in the world. So removing live sport, we are working to replace the experience until it comes back with incredible content as you and I have talked about with exciting things like The Last Dance, which is now the number one viewing experience out there.

Gabe Larsen : (05:03)
For people who don’t know what that is, give them just 30 second on that.

Douglas Kramon: (05:07)
Sure, so the last dance is a docuseries about the 97-98 season of the Bulls and Michael Jordan leading that team. And really the last time that team would be together and it shows the evolution of the Bulls from the early nineties on. And of course their premier players: Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen-

Gabe Larsen : (05:34)
It’s really well done.

Douglas Kramon: (05:34)
It really is an incredible storytelling experience. It’s not a live sport.

Gabe Larsen : (05:39)
I’m on episode four.

Douglas Kramon: (05:40)
Soon enough, you got two more to go before this weekend release – I think Saturday. It’s something where passion for sport is still there and we’re seeing that. So right now we shifted from live viewing triaged, in the moment triaged, for live sport because in customer service, for what I do, we’re like a Formula One pit crew. And while all I care about is be brief, be bright and be gone. That’s true enough.

Gabe Larsen : (06:11)
I love that. Say it one more time. That’s kind of been the typical thing of customer service right?

Douglas Kramon: (06:17)
Sure. Be brief, be bright and be gone so you can get the next fan or the next customer and service them and be smart about it. We’re looking at a situation now where we use to get contacts from fans and triage, get you connected appropriately to your TV provider, allow you to view something on a larger screen, you get a lot of technical issues, or it’s lock time almost for fantasy baseball, help you with your rosters. All of that is live triaged and we have special tools where we can see what’s coming over the horizon and hit us. So we know in the moment what to be prepared for. We have great tools that turn dark data into live data and what’s coming to the sender and what folks are saying on social and everywhere. But when it suddenly shuts off the live sport tab and we have to go to video on demand, it’s a different kind of support model, but it’s one where we have the opportunity to also have fan-to-fan dialogue. We like to say, and we believe this wholeheartedly, for customer service, we are fellow fans in the stands with our fans. We’re not the suits in the suites, meaning we’re there with you. We’re sports fans just like you –

Gabe Larsen : (07:33)
I love that.

Douglas Kramon: (07:33)
– and we understand what you’re going through and if you want to talk a little sport, we do too. And that’s what we do and our C-SAT reflects that. So it’s one where we have now, interestingly enough, a little more time for that dialogue and discussion, not so much debate, and if it is, it’s off the cuff and it’s jovial. But we, like the fans we know, miss sport. And so we see it in C-SAT, they wanted to come back and we like to say, “We miss it too,” and then we talk a little sport and we move on.

Gabe Larsen : (08:10)
Okay. So I got to click into that for a minute. The typical motion has been kind of be brief, you know, get off, be gone. I liked your saying better. But now, you’re open a little more, you kind of push that based on the changes to have a dialogue because I’m missing sports, the ref’s missing sports. So is there some examples? I mean, you’re having people then kind of be like call in for a problem, but it is, I really miss my Celtics man. You Celtics fan? And next thing you know, five minutes later, we’re talking about the glory days with Garnett and winning a couple championships. Is that kind of what’s going on?

Douglas Kramon: (08:48)
Absolutely. Just yesterday for example, we have a C-SAT, customer satisfaction survey response, and I’ll tell you what the fan said. Fan gave the agent five out of five stars and said, “I called to relay a story about coach Don Shula. As you know, Don Shula passed away recently. I was a highschool coach for 47 years and I spoke about motivation for the 1972 Dolphins. Mark was very attentive, the agent Mark, to the story and he listened and he loved it. And that’s important to me. He’s a great employee for ESPN. Thank you for allowing me to share this conversation.”

Gabe Larsen : (09:29)
No way!

Douglas Kramon: (09:29)
We also have others where Alex, for example, and the fan writes to C-SAT, he was, “prompt, helpful and amazing with troubleshooting. But it sucks that he’s a Jets fan, but as the Bills are my team, I have no room to talk.” So as you can see, there’s a jovial nature and a conversational nature from our fans where you reach a care agent. You’re reaching a brand specialist who is also a brand protector. We have chatbots. We have FAQ deflectors. We have self service. We have AI in the IVR methods. Hang on, let me put my dog out real quick.

Gabe Larsen : (10:17)
You’re good! It’s the reality man, the dog [inaudible] that goes, it’s the way the world is right now.

Douglas Kramon: (10:20)
This is the new reality. I have to be here with my dog in the office. So we are brand protectors or agents. When you actually reach the live agent, it’s human-to-human interaction, fan-to-fan. And we see it in our C-SAT and Gabe, let me point out during this time since the quarantine, which is about March 15th to today. What is it we’re looking at, May 8th?

Gabe Larsen : (10:49)
Coming up on two months, coming up on two, right?

Douglas Kramon: (10:51)
Our C-SAT has never been higher. Never.

Gabe Larsen : (10:55)
That’s awesome.

Douglas Kramon: (10:56)
When you compare it to this time last year, we’re 14% higher and if you compare it to the 40 days prior to 45 days prior to that, we’re 9% higher and it’s because our agents are showing a dialogue, empathy, understanding, compassion, and letting fans know we miss it too. We miss-

Gabe Larsen : (11:18)
I love that. So a couple of follow ups on that one is, how do you find p– How do you find agents like that? I mean, I feel like I’d be a good agent-

Douglas Kramon: (11:26)
You would, I bet you would.

Gabe Larsen : (11:26)
– in one of your operations because I watch ESPN– Well, I did watch it religiously every night just to be kind of up on the latest because I like to have kind of the, what do they call it? The cooler room talk-

Douglas Kramon: (11:40)
Absolutely! The water cooler talk.

Gabe Larsen : (11:40)
– the water cooler talk. How do you find these people, do you actually screen for fools like me who loves sports or what’s kind of the –

Douglas Kramon: (11:51)
Well, the answer is an absolute yes. So you have to pass a sports test to work at ESPN and customer service and ultimately you have to show passion for sport in the interview. We would like you to know fantasy football or baseball or basketball or hockey. You don’t need to know them all. Then we ask for a sports story and Gabe, for example, I’m a Jets fan. It’s challenging to be a Jets fan because the Jets are at the bottom of the barrel most of the time. So it’s one day they won’t be, but we’re suffering Jets fans. Our feeling is this. You love your team because they’re yours, not because they’re great. I want a story from every agent that tells me what they love about their favorite sports star, the game, their team, their love of a specific event. Like they watched the 1980 Olympics hockey team, USA hockey win. And tell us a story. I need to know that you’re connected to sport.

Gabe Larsen : (13:02)
I love that. When you get someone to tell that story, I’m sure it can come out. You can just gauge very quickly kind of the passion and the realness about stories. Do you want to hear my story, Doug?

Douglas Kramon: (13:13)
Of course.

Gabe Larsen : (13:13)
I’m thinking of The Last Dance. I’ll make this one brief. I don’t remember if it was ’97 or ’98, but I’m from Salt Lake City, Utah. I’m thinking Jordan game six, Byron Russell, driving to the whole Jordan memory. Jordan does that push and he sinks it and puts Utah out of it again. I mean, Utah is never going to win an NBA championship. They had their chance, but obviously they had to come against the Jordan era.

Douglas Kramon: (13:47)
That was the first Karl Malone game, if I’m correct.

Gabe Larsen : (13:50)
Yeah! Karl Malone, John Stockton. I mean, that was the team. Again we’re a small market company and so [inaudible] every year and –

Douglas Kramon: (13:57)
Was Clyde Drexler on that team possibly? That was a power team.

Gabe Larsen : (14:02)
It was.

Douglas Kramon: (14:02)
It’s the storytelling that you see, it brings it back, the memories. That’s what sports are about. Now, don’t get me wrong. I work in customer care, I’m constantly dealing with things that are issues, broken links, incorrect team logos, pages that are broken that won’t display, let’s say video issues with stutter, jitter, or black screen, et cetera, fantasy confusion. We’re constantly triaging. It never ends. But deep down, when you peel that layer of the onion back, you’re speaking to a fan just like you and they’re more likely to appreciate the conversation and remain an ESPN fan if there is a human element to that.

Gabe Larsen : (14:47)
Yeah. So that would be my followup on that. When you kind of mentioned, and it sounds like you got a decent amount of sophistication in this, you do have some bots, you have some deflection, you’ve got some knowledge base, you’ve got live agents, IVR intelligence on IVR. Without going into extreme detail, how do you kind of find that balance of the individual interaction, but also being efficient and effective and deflecting and making sure that people can self service a little bit? Quick thoughts on that?

Douglas Kramon: (15:19)
So we have tools that determine, based on frequency, recency, frequency, sentiment, and velocity. We know what fans are saying to us via– and I’ll talk on live channels, chat, phone, SMS, right? So those are the ones that we’re doing. Email is not live.

Gabe Larsen : (15:40)
So which one’s most active for you guys?

Douglas Kramon: (15:43)
SMS is growing by leaps and bounds –

Gabe Larsen : (15:45)
Really?

Douglas Kramon: (15:45)
– because the younger demo loves it and we’re finding C-SAT highest on SMS because you move at the pace of the fan. When the fan is texting back and forth with you, they might be doing other things during their day, whether or not in quarantine. They’re moving around and they ask a question. They don’t expect an immediate synchronous response. If they do, our SMS is faster, the agent responds quicker. If not, we see a top C-SAT score with an average response time between three and eight minutes of a response back to a fan, meaning it’s moving at the speed of the fan. So we know the most common questions that are coming into us based on a rapid analysis of keyword extraction rate. And so we immediately put the things up that an FAQ could respond to and put it out there for our bots, our chat bot or SMS bot, our traditional and all of that. But, if you get passed through to an agent and the bot has failed, you immediately move to the top of the queue [inaudible] trying to address. And we then capture, what is that question? And we determine maybe that’s something where we can put that out. [Inaudible] The goal is, if you reach my agent, we have to do what’s called a plus one. Not only do we give you the answer, but we know you didn’t want to reach out to us to begin with. Reaching out to customer service is not fun. We need to make sure that you’re satisfied and that we surprise you with a sports knowledge opportunity, information of an article that might interest you about what we just discussed. So for example, if you’re talking fantasy football and it’s information that now Frank Gore has signed a one year deal with the Jets and you want to understand how you can use Frank Gore, when will he be available in fantasy on the Jets? We will just say details on that and, “by the way, check out this article.” [inaudible] gives details about what Frank Gore’s impact may be on fantasy with the Jets. So always an opportunity just to do a little bit more. Why sports is based on emotion and fans retain that.

Gabe Larsen : (18:13)
Yes. Yeah. I love that. I think, actually, fans do want the self service. For a while, it was a little at a negative connotation, but as a fan, I kind of want to get– if I have those quick answers or quick questions, getting quick answers, I’d prefer to self serve.

Douglas Kramon: (18:29)
Yes. It’s exactly. I think fans prefer self service.

Gabe Larsen : (18:33)
I’m open to chat with somebody and obviously there’s very specific things sometimes where it’s like, look, there’s no bot that can help me with this. I gotta make two transitions from two airlines in two countries. Like I got to talk to someone about this flight, it’s too complicated.

Douglas Kramon: (18:48)
You used to say to our bot, “Agent.” Boom, it goes right to an agent. Our bots don’t take themselves too seriously. They know when to say, “Okay, I’m done.”

Gabe Larsen : (19:00)
Oh, yeah. Well, Doug, we’re coming to the end here. But, you’re my new favorite customer care expert. Loved our conversation. So fun to kind of hear some of the things you guys are doing to react, some of the priorities you’re taking and then just some of the advice you’ve given. And I’d like to end with that. As you think about the audience, other customer care leaders fight the same battles you’re fighting — obviously different brands, different situations, industry, but a lot of the same. We’re all we’re all in quarantine. Let’s see what last piece of advice you’d kind of give to make everybody feel, give them that tip that they can use to win.

Douglas Kramon: (19:35)
That’s a great question. Honestly, you’re not going to have great customer service or fan support as we call it. If this were Disney, we call it like guest support, or viewer support, or whatever it may be. Last year agents were feeling good. Now granted, our agents are now all working at home. They used to work in a center because it’s sports is collaborative and we know that a center is best for that. But when they’re working at home, my recommendation is you have happy agents. You will have happy fans. And it’s a challenge. So we have identified three things. We want to make sure that we have a motivating workspace for our agents. We want to ensure collaboration daily with other agents like you’re in the center. And we have a website where we do constant coffee breaks and we also award agents on a regular basis through what we call nutrition. So it’s workspace, collaboration, and nutrition. Remember these are [inaudible] agents. They’re with their families. So you had a great C-SAT? You’re going to get a family size pizza arriving at your door with a little note from ESPN saying, “Thank you for doing what you are doing.” with the C-SAT review directly below it and letting them know we appreciate them. That means they’re more likely to go to a comfortable workspace that they’ve set up for themselves, that they’re collaborating with others as if they’re in the center and they’re feeling good that we appreciate them. And we’re feeding them where the opportunity presents itself, because these are incredibly challenging times for family and for individuals. Our best is all about making sure we’re keeping our workplace agents happy and it shows in our C-SAT.

Gabe Larsen : (21:18)
I love that, man. Especially the food part. You know, it must be the young person in me. It’s like the food. I mean, it’s something small, but it makes a difference. So I love that idea. I think –

Douglas Kramon: (21:32)
I agree. We have UFC 249 coming up this weekend, which is the first real live sport opportunity — wings for everybody. So we’re excited about this.

Gabe Larsen : (21:42)
Douglas, we are bringing you back, man. I want to hear about that last part. We did not go deep enough into some of the things you’re doing with your employees. So consider yourself tapped again for round two, maybe in the next couple of months, but appreciate you joining. If someone wants to get in touch with you, learn a little bit more about what you’re doing, what’s the best way to do that?

Douglas Kramon: (22:01)
Sure, Linkedin. I’m right on there as Douglas Kramon, K – R – A – M – O – N. I’m happy to chat. I’m always open to learning new things and to sharing.

Gabe Larsen : (22:10)
Love it. Alright well hey, really appreciate your time and for the audience, have a fantastic day.

Douglas Kramon: (22:15)
You too Gabe! Thank you so very much.

Exit Voice: (22:22)
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Everything CX Leaders Need to Know About Customer Satisfaction Metrics

woman on phone

Customer service leaders have a lot of data to track and interpret, with customer service satisfaction metrics as some of the most important. But these satisfaction metrics aren’t just for evaluating the efficacy of support agents. They also correlate strongly to customer loyalty and can help inform business decisions across various departments.

We’re covering some of the most frequently asked questions our CX team receives about the most valuable customer satisfaction metrics and the best customer service measurement methods. Use this guide as a quick reference point when measuring and tracking customer satisfaction.

Why Is Customer Satisfaction Important?

The core reasons to prioritize customer satisfaction are customer loyalty, customer lifetime value and word-of-mouth brand promotion.

However, customer satisfaction can also be correlated to agent satisfaction (ASAT); when one side’s satisfaction levels improve, so do the other’s. Higher agent happiness supports improved performance, employee retention and decreased business and recruiting costs.

What Are the Benefits of Monitoring Customer Satisfaction?

As we’ve established, delivering a great customer experience makes good business sense from all angles. Measuring customer service satisfaction metrics allows you to find out whether or not you’re actually delivering exceptional CX.

You can identify what you’re already doing well and stick to those strategies. And, you can discover new pain points and areas that need improvement. With a data-driven customer service strategy in place, teams across your company will be empowered to formulate the best customer journey possible.

How Do You Measure Customer Service Performance and Success?

Finding the right customer satisfaction measurement system requires setting clear and actionable goals. When choosing metrics for measuring customer service and developing customer satisfaction survey questions, make sure these are aligned with higher-level objectives.

For instance, do you primarily want to track brand loyalty, improve case resolution time or monitor agent effectiveness? You’ll use different parameters to measure customer satisfaction than you would use to track agent performance.

If you’re seeking a 360-degree view of the quality, efficiency and effectiveness of your customer support, you might want to combine operational metrics with customer experience metrics for a more well-rounded perspective.

What Types of Metrics Measure Customer Satisfaction?

Here are the top four customer service satisfaction metrics to measure client satisfaction:

  1. Net promoter score (NPS)
  2. Customer satisfaction (CSAT) score
  3. Customer effort score (CES)
  4. Sentiment analysis

In essence, a quick customer metrics definition would be that NPS is a measure of loyalty, CES is a measure of effort, CSAT is a measure of satisfaction and sentiment analysis is a measure of emotion. Let’s take a closer look at each of these customer service satisfaction metrics.

What Is NPS?

Net promoter score is a calculation of the percentage of a company’s true advocates, and one of a surprisingly versatile customer satisfaction level measurement.

When asked a question such as, “How likely are you to recommend our brand to a friend or colleague?” and prompted to respond on a 10-point Likert scale (with 10 being “highly likely”), advocates are the customers who respond with nine or 10. Detractors are those who respond with a score from zero to six.

NPS is helpful in identifying strong brand advocates, but it also identifies those who are reporting a negative CX. If a customer leaves a low response, it’s good practice to reach out to find out where things went wrong and to offer proactive support.

Armed with more specific knowledge about why a customer gave a certain rating, customer service agents can directly address those issues, thereby potentially improving CX for all customers.

What Is CSAT Score?

Customer satisfaction score is one of the most insightful and specific customer satisfaction survey metrics. It’s used to measure an individual customer’s feelings about a specific interaction with your support team. Again, CSAT is measured through a Likert scale question.

“One of the benefits of CSAT surveys is that you can gather feedback from customers immediately after an interaction with your team,” explains Kustomer’s Senior Product Manager John Merse. “This helps you better understand customers’ experiences in real time. You can segment the results by agent, team and — most importantly — channel.”

For the most accurate assessment of customer satisfaction, you’ll need to measure CSAT across different channels and review the results collectively.

“In a true omnichannel environment it’s important to understand that each channel is unique and requires a specific communication style,” Merse adds. “For example, while you may have a 90%-plus satisfaction via email, if you are not tracking chat or SMS, you might find that your communication is not as effective and your overall customer satisfaction is not as high as you think.”

If you’re wondering what a good CSAT score is, check out this list of benchmarks segmented by industry from the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

What Is CES?

Customer effort score is a customer service metric that provides deeper insights into CX during a support interaction.

“You can essentially think of CES as tracking the effort a customer puts into using your product or service,” Merse says. “The more effort that is needed over time will likely erode their loyalty.”

A CES survey might ask to what extent a customer agrees with a statement like, “This company made it easy for me to handle my issue.” This score helps measure the overall effectiveness of support.

Gartner, which developed the CES metric, reports that customer effort is the most significant factor in a customer’s loyalty or disloyalty. Monitoring CES can help CX leaders uncover and remedy high-effort pain points in customer interactions for more frictionless support.

What Is Sentiment Analysis?

Sentiment analysis — also known as opinion mining — is the process of determining whether a customer’s language reflects positive, negative or neutral sentiment. Using natural language processing capabilities, CX professionals can gain automated insights into the emotions driving customer interactions.

Sentiment scores assign a numeric value to the message, conversation and customer. Reports based on sentiment changes or themes related to positive or negative sentiment can help you better understand your customers and the service they’re experiencing.

Can I Use CES in Combination With Sentiment, CSAT or NPS?

Absolutely! By combining customer service satisfaction metrics, you can access a more complete understanding of the customer support experience. For instance, although a CES score tells you effort level, it doesn’t get to the why of the customer’s response or how they feel overall about your brand. For that, you need additional customer service satisfaction metrics.

What are some strategies for improving customer satisfaction?

Here are six strategies that can have a huge payoff on CX and customer satisfaction rates:

  1. Utilize best-in-class customer service as a brand differentiator. Many customer-first brands and category disruptors have already done this, but it’s never too late for change at your own organization.
  2. Segment your satisfaction scores by demographics, products and support channels to uncover underlying problems in specific areas.
  3. Reinvest in your customer support team with new, customer-oriented skills and training programs.
  4. Deliver proactive support to minimize negative CX. This could involve sending notifications about shipping delays, getting ahead of negative reviews with offers or product exchanges and similar strategies.
  5. Provide customers with easily navigable self-service content. A strong knowledge base or FAQ section helps customers resolve basic issues on their own.
  6. Evaluate whether your customer service technology is truly empowering your agents to deliver exceptional quality. Have high expectations for your technology partners and find software solutions that support a unified omnichannel experience.

Got more questions about measuring and interpreting customer satisfaction metrics? Connect with a CX expert at Kustomer.
 

How to Turn Data Into Action and Measure the Success of a Support Team

How to Turn Data Into Action and Measure the Success of a Support Team TW

Data is powerful, perhaps more than many of us realize. It contains nearly infinite applications. Yet while its limitless possibilities are seductive, they also provide ample opportunities to get lost in the weeds. One of the most useful applications of data in the support world is the measurement of your team’s performance. With the help of historical data, you can learn a thing or two about how your team performed in the past. But how can you take it a step further? Turn your data into action and use it to build a strategy for the future.

Define Success

Think through the ultimate goals that you are trying to achieve. While it may be tempting to chase a quick average handle time or a CSAT benchmark, you might find more use in pursuing customer outcomes as your primary goal. As CA technologies notes, “measurements don’t always indicate the outcome of the work, and whether it’s truly impacting the business.” Are your customers happy? Are you providing the service that you advertised? These outcomes, while abstract, can elicit more empathy from your support team than a simple number. Use your metrics as a secondary focus. If your agents are instructed to simply make your customers happy, they’ll be less likely to game the numbers in their favor.

Monitor Your Team in Real-Time

One of the most difficult aspects of measuring team performance is the fact that we are continually looking towards the past. Average handle time, first response time, and similar metrics only show you what’s happened. A real-time view of your support team can be a powerful tool.

Use something like a Team Pulse dashboard to understand how your agents are performing in the present. A dashboard like this can show you how many conversations are currently being handled, how many conversations have been recently completed, and which types of queues are currently in use. What’s even more insightful is the ability to understand which agents are at full capacity and which agents have bandwidth to take on additional tasks. If you notice that one of your agents is perpetually at or over capacity, that may be a signal that they need help.

Dig Deep

If you are working in the customer support space, chances are high that you already have a good handle on the basics. You know that fast average response times are desirable and long average handle times should be avoided. Instead of rehashing common knowledge, let’s dig deeper into a sample dataset. For this exercise, I’ll use the 2018 customer survey data provided by San Francisco International Airport.

I’ve cleaned the data to focus on a handful of variables: day of the week, gate, boarding area, STRATA (AM, MID, PM), peak vs. off-peak, and satisfaction score. Satisfaction scores are ranked from 1 – 5. Let’s say I’ve been tasked by SFO to understand why certain passengers may have ranked their experience lower than others. Are there trends to discover?

First, I want to see if I can predict which variables are most likely to affect the CSAT scores.

There’s a couple of interesting things to note here. “STRATA” is the most highly correlated with satisfaction scores. In other words, whether a passenger flies at morning, midday, or evening can influence whether they are satisfied with their experience. This correlation may be a hint that I need to analyze the teams that service the airport during those chunks of time. As a disclaimer here, this particular model captures only a sliver of data. It still provides a good sandbox.

Knowing that time of day may be a factor in customer satisfaction, I dig deeper.

We can see here that the overwhelming majority of respondents are happy with their experience (ranking SFO with a 4 or 5). However, we do see that respondents who fly at STRATA 3 (ie, on flights departing after 5pm) are more likely to report lower satisfaction scores than other times of day.

Finally, I want to understand how satisfaction scores are reported by boarding area.

Another interesting observation emerges. Passengers who flew through boarding area A were more likely to report lower satisfaction scores. It’s worth noting that this boarding area also had the highest number of respondents.

Given what I’ve uncovered through the data, now might be the time where I want to approach the team to understand what’s happening from their perspective. Maybe there aren’t enough staff for the number of passengers moving through boarding area A after 5pm. Maybe there’s construction. Either way, I would start by speaking with the team to understand, rather than using the data as a weapon.

While this example may seem hyper-specific, consider the fact that SFO could be your support team, STRATA could be their shift schedules, and the boarding area could be something like the type of customer request.

Adapt and Evolve

Consider how new technology can affect your support team’s KPIs. Be on the lookout for “red herrings” in your data. Let’s say you’ve invested in a chat deflection tool as part of an ongoing initiative to drive efficiency through artificial intelligence. Part of this investment means that many of the common support requests typically fielded by your agents are now handled by AI. Initially, you celebrate the rise in deflected inquiries, but you become concerned about dropping CSAT scores. You determine the cause after careful investigation: your chat deflection tool is handling simple requests while your agents are working on more complex customer issues. These complex customer issues don’t always have a straightforward answer and satisfaction scores are suffering as a result.

It may be tempting to pull the plug on your deflection tool to save your satisfaction scores and the team’s morale. But instead of retreating, dig deeper. Consider the fact that you may need to start documenting a new type of data like a complexity score. Find a way to measure the complexity of your customer requests and use that data to paint a more accurate picture of your team’s success.

Want to learn more about how the right customer service software can help your team perform to the best of their abilities? Download our Buyer’s Guide here.

 

Measuring the Intangible Benefits of a Customer Service Solution

When companies begin to look for customer service solutions, it’s often because there are major issues they need to solve. But oftentimes, these issues are intangible things such as a general lack of efficiency, a sense of ineffectiveness, a need for call deflection and other matters that seem hard to quantify. The benefits of customer service might seem hard to measure at first.

After identifying concrete and intangible challenges, the next step for companies is to find a way to resolve those issues and ultimately achieve customer service success. This certainly won’t happen overnight, but the process is worth it when you consider the benefits of quality customer service for your customers as well as your company as a whole.

Here, we describe the characteristics and benefits of excellent customer service and cover how to measure them.

Who Benefits From Good Customer Service?

The answer to this question really is that everyone involved benefits from excellent customer service. If you think about it, what is the purpose of good customer service if not to create more satisfied and loyal customers, happier and more successful agents and a healthier bottom line?

There really are benefits of providing quality customer service for the customer, the agent and the business as a whole. In many cases, when one aspect is improved, all stakeholders will experience the positive impact. The results of good customer service and the advantages of service quality improvements can often be felt instinctively, but they can also be quantified with some of the top customer satisfaction metrics.

Benefits of Customer Service Excellence

Let’s explore some of the top benefits of customer service excellence for the customer, agent and business — and how you can measure them:

Increased Customer Service Efficiency

An efficient process is one that requires little input but yields maximum output. Improved efficiency in a customer service environment means that you empower your customer support agents to do less and help more. The advantages of this are increased productivity, higher-quality customer service and a stronger sense of job satisfaction. After all, how many employees want to work harder and produce fewer results?

Using Kustomer, agents can use shortcut words to type a complete sentence with just a #hashtag, while quick keys allow them to use the keyboard instead of the mouse. With these tools, some agents can handle multiple chat screens while others are better able to process emails more quickly. Additionally, the Kustomer timeline surfaces all customer interactions on a single screen, preventing the need to bounce back and forth between different systems.

All of these elements lead to a more efficient and productive workforce. Organizations that demonstrate improved efficiency can track improvements through customer satisfaction metrics like faster resolution times and an increase in the number of conversations each agent handles.

Greater Customer Service Effectiveness

Increased effectiveness means making it easier for agents to excel at their jobs. This involves providing agents with the right customer service training, tools and resources to successfully resolve customer issues and offer personalized support.

For example, Kustomer’s actionable context cards allow agents to do things like issue refunds directly from their screens and easily route conversations to other agents who can provide the right type of assistance.

Companies that increase customer service effectiveness realize benefits through improved customer satisfaction (CSAT) scores, faster case resolution times and higher customer retention rates.

Improved Customer Deflection

Companies that can deflect easily avoidable customer support conversations free up agents’ time for more complex issues.

This can be done by providing resources like an easily accessible knowledge base or FAQ section which deflect simple questions like the company’s hours of operation, store locations and refund policies. Even an AI chatbot can address immediate needs before transferring customers to a live chat with a skilled agent when needed. Additionally, proactive outreach capabilities allow agents to address customer concerns before they arise. An example might be sending a notification to all customers in a certain region that an impending storm system may delay shipments.

Not only are these self-service resources beneficial for customers, who can get immediate answers with very little effort, but they also take a burden off of customer care agents who then have the bandwidth to handle higher-level issues. Organizations that successfully deflect customer support conversations witness the benefits of good customer service by seeing a lower number of new cases and more favorable customer effort scores (CES).

Enhanced Satisfaction and Loyalty

The ability to give or receive exceptional customer support can boost customer satisfaction as well as agent satisfaction (ASAT). All of the above benefits of customer service help establish a more loyal and content workforce as well as a community of happy customers, both of which are critical to business success.

Brand advocates are more likely to spread positive messages about your company to friends and family members, post glowing product reviews or employer feedback, and offer sustained support for your company. New employees and customers are more expensive to acquire, so facilitating a great employee and customer experience should be a top priority. Metrics for measuring success in this area include CSAT score, ASAT score and net promoter score (NPS) as well as customer and employee retention rates and churn.

Better-Informed Business Decision-Makers

In addition to the more obvious advantages of customer care success, such as a bottom-line boost and increased word-of-mouth reach, there are also benefits of evaluating customer service experience and performance.

Any good customer care strategy involves tracking KPIs and monitoring important customer service metrics. Armed with insights like CES, CSAT, net promoter score, sentiment analysis, resolution time, call abandonment rate, resolution rate and customer retention, decisionmakers can implement data-driven, customer-centric changes and continue monitoring the results.

Now that you’re familiar with some of the key benefits of a good customer service solution, find out what specific tools and features you should be looking for in our buyer’s guide.

 

Kustomer Adds Native Satisfaction Measurement

Deliver effortless service and measure performance in one powerful platform.

At Kustomer, we pride ourselves on helping companies deliver support that satisfies customers, builds loyalty, and drives retention. That’s because our customer-centric platform is different from the legacy ticketing systems that create cumbersome and fragmented service experiences. Through a single workspace that unifies customer data, agents are empowered to meet customers’ needs on any channel they use.

And while SLAs and productivity metrics are incredibly valuable when measuring support success, we believe the best indicator comes from customers themselves. Their feedback drives continuous improvement for businesses and their support operations. And while satisfaction measurement solutions can provide powerful insights, they require additional budget, splinter customer data and agent experiences across multiple systems, and fail to account for the varied communication experiences on each particular channel.

That’s why we’re proud to announce the launch of Kustomer Satisfaction—our native tool that measures, tracks, and manages customer satisfaction across all your support channels, directly in the Kustomer platform. With Kustomer, providing effortless service and gaining incredible insight into how your customers feel regarding their interactions exist together in a single platform.

Kustomer Satisfaction is built on the backbone of the Kustomer platform, enhancing your ability to gather feedback and incorporating satisfaction information into the agent workspace, making customer satisfaction or effort highly visible and actionable. Surveys are simple to set up, designed to make survey taking easy and engaging, and optimized for each of your channels to ensure high response rates and confidence in how your team and agents are performing. Go a level deeper in your satisfaction evaluation by targeting and surveying specific customer segments.

Tailor surveys for an optimal experience on each channel.

Each channel is unique, and requires a specific style of communication. Customize Satisfaction questions and survey styles on Chat, Email, SMS and Voice conversations to ensure high response rates anywhere your customers communicate. Chat and Email Satisfaction surveys are built natively in Kustomer, so customers provide feedback directly from the conversation, without interruption.

Collect feedback from whomever you want, whenever you want.

Don’t rely on a single overall score for your entire customer support operation. Segment and survey customers at any time based on any desired criteria (VIP status, lifetime value, products, demographics, etc.), expanding your ability to rate customer experience and providing a more detailed picture of satisfaction.

Analyze your results.

Monitor topline trends, and drill down into results for specific channels, teams, agents and interactions to identify coaching, content, and policy opportunities that will take your support team to the next level.

To learn more about Kustomer Satisfaction, check out our Knowledge Base Article.

5 Reasons You Need to Measure Lifetime Value

In this post by Kustomer VP of Marketing Nelly Rinot, Nelly shares the key reasons why Lifetime Value should be your bottom-line metric for customer experience.

There is a huge number of good metrics to measure your customer service. However, Lifetime Value should always be your top consideration. Here are the top five reasons we’ve determined from our :

  1. Other metrics are geared around your agents, not your customers: Average Handle Time and First Contact Resolution are two prime examples of valuable metrics that don’t give you the insight you need beyond an operational approach. They make sense for figuring out how cost-effective your service is—how many customers your agents can handle before they’re at capacity. But while productive agents can help more customers faster, they should do more than work as fast as possible to resolve an issue. To deliver a good experience, your first consideration shouldn’t be efficiency—it should be whether your customers are happy.
  2. CSAT and NPS don’t give you the whole picture: These metrics are a great way to know whether your service is effective on a macro-level. If customers aren’t satisfied, you need to know. However, knowing that they’re unhappy and WHY they’re unhappy are two very different things. CSAT and NPS measure if you are satisfying your customers in the moment, but doesn’t tell you about their behavior after you’ve engaged. Plus, these surveys only capture a tiny, unrepresentative minority of customers. And in most cases, they’re only speaking to the interaction they just had, not their entire experience with your brand.
  3. Sentiment doesn’t tell you what your customers aren’t saying: Sentiment based on natural language processing is less biased than CSAT and NPS, because it accounts for all the interactions on every channel. That’s a huge step up, but it still won’t answer fundamental questions about your business—you still don’t know what’s going unsaid. Only 1 out of every 26 customers complain if something is wrong with their experience, so even high volume NLP only measures a fraction of what’s going on beneath the surface.
  4. Other metrics don’t take actions into account: For a total customer view, you need to understand all of your customers’ actions and behaviors on top of all the previous metrics. Other metrics don’t record how often they’ve contacted you for service or support, if their buying behaviors have changed, if they’ve abandoned items in their cart, changed their subscription tier, returned or exchanged a product, or engaged with you on social media. All of these actions will help you understand why your customers will or will not come back to buy again.
  5. Lifetime Value is the best predictor of your brand’s success: A 5% increase in customer retention can increase a company’s profitability by 75%, according to Bain & Company. Getting customers to keep buying from you is fundamental to growing your business. No matter what else you know about your customers, if you don’t know their Lifetime Value, you don’t know if you’re going to be successful.

Using a variety of customer experience metrics is crucial for getting a better understanding of your business. They all give you an important piece of the bigger picture. However, if they don’t ladder up towards Lifetime Value, then you don’t know how your service, support, and experience are contributing to overall business health. If you aren’t measuring LTV yet, good news—it’s never too late to start.

Tell Me How You Really Feel: The Best Metric For Finding What Your Customers Need

Brandon McFadden is Kustomer’s Customer Success & Support Manager, you can follow him on Twitter at @brandontonio. Read his post on using CES to help your product and service teams work better together here. The following was adapted from a workshop delivered at Support Driven Expo in Portland, OR.

After recently writing a piece about using CES to help your product teams, I received some questions asking, among other things, what CES even is. So I wanted to go over that here.

Customer Effort Scoring is one of the most effective ways to understand how your audience feels about their experience, and has some distinct advantages over methods like CSAT and NPS. The principle is simple: you’re asking your customers how difficult it was to solve their issue or complete a transaction. Like NPS or CSAT, it only takes one question to get the information you need. Below we can see two examples of CES survey questions:

So what makes a Customer Effort Score such a useful metric? The answer is rooted in human nature, specifically feelings. 96% of customers don’t complain when they’re unhappy, however they’re four times as likely to defect to a competitor if they have a problem. So while finding out if your customers enjoy their experience is critical, it doesn’t always tell the whole story. Here’s the kicker: 70% of buying experiences are based on how the customer feels they are being treated. So even if your service is best-in-class for your industry, if your customers have unknown, higher expectations and your service feels lacking, they’re going to retain that feeling going forward. So the real question for the data-driven team is: How do you quantify feelings?

That’s why CES is so useful—it can tell you how your customers really feel, where other methods focus on intent and how your customers see themselves instead of addressing the feelings that drive their actions. While your clients may give a high CSAT score, what they’re saying is “I really liked talking to your team, they are AMAZING!” (and who doesn’t want to hear that?) but what they might also be thinking (feeling) is, “Why did I even have to call in the first place?” Most people don’t want to speak badly about or hurt the career of an agent, especially when they solved the problem, but they will hold a negative experience against your brand as a whole when their expectation was that the fix should have been easier—or if they never expected to have this problem to start with. To make matters worse, this usually only manifests itself when it is time to recommend your service/product. Lesson? Your agents might be doing great work (of course they are, you hire great people), but that doesn’t always lead to more referrals and repeat customers.

Typically this is where NPS seems like it should provide the other half of the picture you’re missing from CSAT. If customers are satisfied but not willing to recommend you, then something in your experience is lacking, right?. There’s nothing wrong with that assumption, but NPS also has pitfalls of its own, once again sabotaged by feelings. Often, customers will say they would recommend you to their friends, but in practice, they don’t. Interestingly, the problem is found in the NPS question itself: “How likely are you to recommend this product to a friend?”. When we think of our friends, we think of people just like us, same skill aptitude, same patience, same willingness to put up with the “why did I even have to call about this” issues. But in reality, when it comes time to make the actual recommendation, they balk. They think “oh, they aren’t as technical as me” or “they likely don’t have the same patience with that issue like I did”. So while maybe they would recommend your product in general, on a one-to-one basis, they might have lingering doubts about a difficult experience and don’t feel their personal friends would have the patience to deal with your service.

What NPS and CSAT don’t do well is make it easy to identify your customers’ hidden frustrations and reluctance to advocate for you in the real world. Neither help you pinpoint the parts of your product or process that cause the most frustration, not simply have the most quantity. This is why 82% of US companies report that they are “customer-centric”, while only 18% of US customers agree. Clearly, there’s a disconnect between how companies see themselves, and how customers see them. But if their NPS and CSAT scores are high, why should they think otherwise?

Ultimately, this is because customers are thinking: “If you really cared about me, then why are you making it so hard to do something I think should be so easy?” It’s probably a question you’ve even asked yourself when you’ve been on the phone with customer support. Fortunately, with CES, these feelings are able to be captured and quantified.

Let’s look at an example of the Customer Expectation Gap in action. I recently had two experiences where my expectations and the reality were way off, giving me two very different opinions of the organizations I was dealing with after the fact. Those organizations were Amazon and the DMV—about as different as you can get. One is “tech” and optimized to solve your problems, and the other is the DMV.

I’m pretty sure that if I offered you the choice of getting a new license at the DMV or requesting a refund from Amazon—you would choose Amazon every time (and for good reason, their support is fantastic). While I didn’t have to choose in the moment, I did have to get a refund for a Netflix gift-card purchased through Amazon (silly me, didn’t coordinate with my brother). Given their renowned and very streamlined buying experiences, I thought the process would be just as easy. In a way, you could say that they trained me to think this would be just as easy as buying. This, frankly, is the blessing/curse of tech. We spend endless time making things easier, automating, reducing effort—meaning it hurts that much more when this doesn’t happen with Support resolutions. Inversely, around the same time, I needed to replace my license at the New York City DMV—a much-maligned experience and a staple of 90s stand up—albeit for good reasons. I expected this to be an all-day ordeal (ok, maybe half day), because it had been before in multiple states over the past 20 years for me. I had been trained to expect the worst.

However, getting my refund from Amazon was the real bureaucratic nightmare, stretching across four calls and two 15-minute chat sessions, and taking over 2 days to resolve. On the other hand, the DMV was a breeze. I booked ahead online, found an “express office”, checked-in on a screen, followed an express lane to an automated machine, and was done in less than 30 minutes. Now, I’ve been bragging about the NYC DMV to my friends (who think I’m crazy), and certainly haven’t recommended ever getting a gift card from Amazon. The funny thing is that If I had called up Amazon expecting a hassle, I wouldn’t have remarked on it, and if I had known that the DMV had become so cutting-edge (kind of), then maybe I wouldn’t have been wowed. So as you can see, it really is the combination of how I felt about the experience, my expectations, and the relative effort I had to expend that determined whether or not I became an advocate.

To be clear, none of this is to say that you shouldn’t measure NPS and CSAT. You absolutely should, and they are crucial metrics for understanding your business. But if you want to know how your customers really feel about your experience, they leave too many gaps. With CES, you can fill those gaps and get all the context you need to identify where your experience is weak, and how you can improve it. So maybe start by adding a 2nd CES question to your post-issue CSAT survey, you may just be surprised by the results. Remember, it’s not about what your customers say—it’s how they feel that creates impact at the moment of their referral, making repeat purchases, and when they decide to churn. If you would like to learn more about how you can act on this information, feel free to check out the companion piece: How CES Can Help Your CX and Product Teams Work Better Together.

To learn more about how Kustomer can help you better understand your customers, request a demo below!

Product Update: Get Deeper Insight with Custom Object Searches

Kustomer’s platform for customer experience uniquely collects, organizes, and displays all the available data about your customers in one easy to use timeline. Searches are a way of segmenting conversations, customers, and companies based on properties like customer loyalty level, conversation status, channel and more. We’ve expanded the functionality of Searches to include custom objects as well. With information from tools like Magento, Delighted, or Jira, you’ll now be able to create searches based on any customer data that exists in your business custom objects (Kobjects). And the possibilities are endless.

For example, if you’re an IoT company with a device object, you can use search segmentation to see all the devices that have been registered in the last week as well as all conversations about each model; automatically updating when new information is available.

You probably also collect CSAT information and integrate it into Kustomer to make sure you provide relevant service. With Custom Object Searches it’s easy to create a search for all conversations that received a negative CSAT score in the last week and even further segment that by customer information like subscription tiers, location, or total dollars spent. Teams can then easily prioritize outreach in order to maximize customer satisfaction.

No need to invest in highly-priced enterprise software or in-house development. With Kustomer your team is now fully informed and empowered to provide the best service for  every customer.

For more information about Custom Object Searches, check out this article.

Customer Experience is Evolving. Are Your Metrics?

There are a lot of useful metrics for tracking your service, as our CEO Brad Birnbaum recently discussed. However, if you’re just looking at your service through the lens of efficiency and generating the lowest cost to your organization, the chances are that you’re not giving your customers the experience they deserve.

Metrics for Support: AHT and FCR

Many of the longest-standing metrics used to measure customer service are operational in nature: First Contact Resolution and Average Handle Time being two of the most widespread.

  • These metrics work well for determining the cost-effectiveness of your service.
  • They encourage agents to work more quickly and help more customers
  • End-goal is to lower the cost of each interaction

However, this mindset puts a premium on agents working quickly, not delivering a great experience.

  • Agents can scale service, but that doesn’t mean that service is of a high quality.
  • If customers are going away unsatisfied, or keep returning with the same problem, what is the real value of the support you’re offering?

You might be helping a lot of customers, but no matter how inexpensive it is to help each of them individually—you’re still operating your service organization at a loss.

Metrics for Service: CSAT, NPS

Many companies have evolved towards delivering more than just baseline support, but actual satisfying service. A company that delivers service goes further. They invest in their customers to create positive word of mouth and encourage repeat business. Zappos is a good example of a company that brought the benefits of providing real service to customers to the forefront. They strive to make customers happy, offering easy returns and short wait times that make you want to come back for more. If offering a discount means that an agent will save the sale, even if it lowers profitability, then they’re encouraged to take that step. As long as the customer keeps coming back, they’re worth more to the business in the long run. Companies with this service mindset still care about operational metrics, but CX remains a cost center for their business.

  • Customer Satisfaction and Net Promoter Score surveys can tell you how satisfied customers are with individual service interaction.

However CSAT really only tells you if your customers are happy with the service they’re receiving at that moment.

  • Doesn’t fully account for their sentiment around all the interactions they have before and after that engagement.
  • These surveys are biased: the majority of your customers won’t take a CSAT or NPS survey
  • Those that do are much more likely to respond if they’ve had a very good or very bad experience.

While useful as part of a larger mix, in most cases, customers are telling you about the interaction that they just had, not their overall feeling towards your service and brand as a whole.

Metrics for Experience: LTV and Sentiment

To really deliver an incredible experience, agents should prioritize generating repeat business and giving top-quality, personalized service. Beyond that, they should be thinking long term, giving valuable customers a material reason to keep shopping with offers and discounts. If your mindset is about improving your customer experience without worrying about the amount of time or cost behind it, then CX becomes an investment to gain repeat business.

  • Use NLP to track sentiment across all text-driven channels to get large-scale, unbiased insight.

However, you still won’t know what’s going unsaid. Only 1 out of every 26 customers complain if something goes wrong.

  • The key metric has to be Lifetime Value. It’s the only way to know how all the interactions around your brand contribute to a better experience and repeat customers.
  • If you invest in Lifetime Value, then your Customer Experience can drive real revenue for your business: A 5% increase in customer retention can increase a company’s profitability by 75%, according to Bain & Company.

Service doesn’t have to be a sunk cost. it can be a revenue center once you shift your mindset towards totally understanding and serving the customer.

Customer service is evolving, and the way you think about your experience needs to evolve with it. Lifetime Value has to be your top metric if you want to run a 21st century CX organization. Without knowing everything about your customer, you’ll never know how much you have to win by putting their needs first. There is a world of business to be won if you offer the best experience possible.

The Why, How, and What of Measuring Customer Service Quality

This is a guest post by Jakub Slámka, CMO at Nicereply

As customer service professionals, we’re in the business of making sure our customers get the highest quality support. We strive to help them succeed with the highest caliber guidance we can provide, and to solve their problems with excellent solutions and service. When we do that, it feels good.

To create long term relationships with your customers, you need to understand how and why they act the way they do. There are three surveys that work really well for this: Customer Satisfaction, Net Promoter Survey, and Customer Effort Score. All of them involve surveying customers to get their opinion, but they ask different questions to find out different things.

Let’s break them down the Simon Sinek way so you know exactly Why, How, and What to measure when it comes to customer service quality.

Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT)

Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT) is most often used to measure customer’s feelings about a specific interaction with your support team. It can also refer to how happy a customer is generally, though in the customer service industry it usually refers to an agent or a customer support team.

WHY should you measure CSAT?

Measuring customer satisfaction means having a better idea of what works to keep customers satisfied – and what leaves them unhappy. This way you’ll know what to keep up and what to fix. You’ll also be able to gauge performance of not just support generally, but specific teams and individuals as well.

HOW do you measure CSAT?

Customers will receive a survey asking if they were happy or satisfied with the service they received, which they can respond positively or negatively to. The customer chooses their response on a scale from bad (or not satisfied) to good (or satisfied). To calculate the CSAT score, subtract the % of customers who were unhappy from 100%.

WHAT does a CSAT survey look like?

You can set your CSAT survey in one of two different ways. Either you can send out an email with a survey after a ticket is closed, or you can measure it in every email interaction with your customers in the form of “instant ratings”. Survey itself can have many different looks. Nicereply CSAT survey usually looks like 3 smileys portraying different emotions, 2 hand with fingers facing upward or downwards or a scale of 10 stars.

Net Promoter Score (NPS)

Net Promoter Score (NPS) was specifically developed to measure loyalty and to provide you with feedback about how well your products are received. This metric will tell you, how likely your customers will recommend your services or products.

WHY should you measure NPS?

NPS brings a simple solution to finding out who is your loyal customer and transform unhappy clients into satisfied promoters. You can use NPS to enhance your customer service, but it can also be used by your marketing department to gauge your customers feeling toward your product.

How do you measure NPS?

NPS is usually measured via a regular survey (bi-monthly, yearly etc…). In this survey, customers are asked the above question “How likely are you to recommend *|COMPANY|* to a friend or colleague?” and they respond on a scale from 1 (very unlikely) to 10 (very likely).

If a customer answers lower than 6, they are a detractor. If they respond 9 or higher, they are a promoter. Customers responding 7-8 are passives.

NPS is calculated by subtracting the % of customers who replied as detractors from the % of customers who answered as promoters. NPS scores are not a percentage and range from -100 (very bad) to +100 (very good).

WHAT does an NPS survey look like?

Due to it being based on a research by Bain & Co, NPS survey will always look the same—a scale from 0 to 10. The question itself can vary slightly. One such example could be a question “On a scale from 1-10, how likely are you to recommend this organization as a good place to work?”—this is also known as Employee Net Promoter Score.

Customer Effort Score (CES)

Customer Effort Score is a highly specific measure of how much work your customer felt they had to do to solve an issue. Support teams using CES are able to find and eliminate friction points that cause high-effort experiences.

WHY should you measure CES?

Imagine having a problem you need to solve. Now imagine you have to jump through several hoops and switch multiple channels to get hold of someone willing to help you fix it. Even though this support agent might be “super nice”, there’s a big chance you won’t ever want to go through the same experience again.

The idea of CES is that customers enjoy doing business with companies, that are easy to work with. It means, that CES measure the amount of effort customers were experiencing with your company as a whole.

HOW do you measure CES?

CES is often sent as part of a post-service survey and it’s measured by surveying customers after the resolution of their customer service conversation (usually 24 hours after a ticket is closed).

Similar to the NPS before, customers are asked to rate one simple statement: “The *|COMPANY|* made it easy for me to handle my issue.” a standard 1(low) – 7(high) scale whether they agree or disagree with the statement.

Your CES will then be the averages of these ratings, although we recommend to look not just at your average score, but at their distribution as well. Afterall, if your scores are bunch of 7s and 1s, it still means your experience is confusing a lot of people.

WHAT does a CES survey look like?

Being based off of a research paper by CEB, CES survey will always ask the same question. Original CES used a scale of 5 different answers, while updated CES 2.0 uses a scale of 7.

Measure, Manage, and Improve

As the old saying goes, “Whatever gets measured gets managed.” Measuring quality and using what you learn to better meet customer expectations is what will propel your efforts to truly serve your customers and drive your business forward.

Try Nicereply for Kustomer for free and measure any and all of these metrics to get more feedback out of your customer interactions.

Jakub Slámka is CMO at Nicereply.

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