Four Ways to Work Smarter with Business Rules In Kustomer

Four Ways to Work Smarter with Business Rules In Kustomer TW

Here at Kustomer, we are hard at work alleviating customer service teams from the manual busywork that can overwhelm agents, especially when traffic and call volumes are high. Even the simplest request or question can be a distraction from conversations that require more thoughtful attention.

That’s why intelligence is baked into everything we do. Our platform is built to automate menial tasks so organizations can scale and teams can provide personalized, high-quality care that keeps customers happy.

With Kustomer’s Business Rules, anyone can implement automation to free teams from time-consuming tasks. Our easy-to-use rules builder can process simple to complex actions, like sending transactional messages, categorizing conversations, and escalating issues.

We’re breaking down some of the most useful ways your team can work smarter with Business Rules to keep operations running smoothly.

1. Send Automated Messages

There are plenty of reasons to send automated messages—like letting customers know an agent will be right with them, or perhaps you have a specific note or promo you’d like to share.

Automating these communications keeps customers informed, and agents less distracted. Also, an ability to easily implement automated messages lets you build and run them at a moment’s notice.

Business Rules in Kustomer let you control exactly when an automated message is sent and who receives it, so you can provide customers an optimal experience by communicating effectively.

Watch our video to see how easy it is to create automated messages with Business Rules.



2. Add Tags to Conversations

Tagging conversations isn’t just a great way to stay organized—tags work as actionable triggers to automate processes in Kustomer.

Business Rules can be used to add tags to conversations, then those tags can be used to automatically route conversations or escalate issues to specialized teams.

3. Mark Auto Responses ‘Done’ Automatically

A single Business Rule can cover a lot of ground. Auto responses can clog agent queues, and cause SLAs to breach if they aren’t marked ‘Done’. Since auto responses occur with various subject lines, you can create a single rule that automatically marks auto responses complete by identifying possible subject line containing keywords like ‘automatic response’, ‘automated response’, ‘auto response’, etc.

4. Assign Multiple Channels to a Specific Team

It’s hard to anticipate peak interaction times or periods of high conversation volume, so you may need to shift team priorities quickly. You can create a Business Rule that automatically assigns channel-specific conversations to a designated team, making sure all customers are covered during your busiest times.

You can learn more about Business Rules in our Help Center, or get in touch with us to learn how Kustomer improves customer service experiences with AI and automation.

 

Meet the Krew: Cameron Ackbury

Why I joined Kustomer

The date was Thursday January 24, 2019 that TechCrunch alerted me to the article: Kustomer nabs $35M to take on Zendesk and Salesforce with its Slack like approach to CRM. The Series C, led by Battery Ventures, with Redpoint Ventures, Canaan Partners, Boldstart Ventures, Social Leverage (Howard Lindzon’s fund) and Cisco Investments also participating, comes just seven months after the company raised a Series B of $26 million. This article caught my eye because of the gravitas of investors and the investment amount.

As a 15-year industry SaaS software veteran, having grown the likes of NetSuite and Mindjet from nothing to over $100M, I am intimately familiar with companies that raise significant amounts of money, but never quite find their footing in the marketplace. Co-Founders Brad Birnbaum and Jeremy Suriel have a vision that an omnichannel, single customer view — where customers’ histories and live questions exist together to provide agents the full picture to deal with the customer more efficiently — is more valuable for a company than a Zendesk or a Salesforce. I had to learn more about Kustomer.

The commitment that I made to myself early on in my career was that I would only work for a company in which I would invest my time and possibly my money. That company would have to be unique, different, defensible and desirable. In this case, Kustomer was the only company in the market that had an omnichannel, single timeline to engage with customers. They were different from Zendesk and Salesforce in that Kustomer is a workflow enabled application that encompasses all customer related systems into one application. They are defensible in that they have a four-year head start in the market and a well-funded war chest. They are desirable by customers because, well, customers love Kustomer. I needed to meet the team.

My background is the intersection of SaaS software and business technologies. I reached out to Vikas Bhambri, SVP of Sales and CX and asked for a meeting. Interestingly, he responded to me within a few hours. Within a day or so, I was put into the hiring queue. The initial conversations were intellectually stimulating, reflecting a culture to hire the best, while making the experience as pleasant as possible. Within a few weeks, I had met with the sales leadership and executive teams and was sold on the vision. I had to work at Kustomer.

Of course, the team wouldn’t make their decision on hiring me until the following Monday, so I had a long weekend thinking about Kustomer. The customer list was vast and their stories were filled with benefits like “improving visibility by 100% across channels”, “increasing customer satisfaction” and “40% improvement in response time.” These value propositions are music to my ears.

That Monday came quickly and I was happy to learn I was the new Head of the West. Thinking about the gravitas of the investors, the company stability, the culture and the product, I knew that I made the right decision. I am now a happy member of the Krew at Kustomer.

Conversations with Kustomer Podcast: How can Marketing and Customer Support Create a Consistent Experience? Featuring Sue Duris

As Customer Experience overtakes product and price as the key differentiator for many brands, it’s increasingly important that all parts of the organization work together to deliver seamless communications and service.

Our Director of Marketing Chen Barnea sat down with Sue Duris, Director of Marketing and Customer Experience for M4 Communications and a leading CX strategist, to discuss the evolution and importance of CX for B2B and B2C companies across verticals. While their chat covered a lot of ground, we’ve highlighted some of the key points below.

Investing in CX pays off. This is especially true if you’re a leader. According to a Temkin report, CX Leaders see a 17% compound average growth rate, versus 3% for laggards. Customers that receive a great experience are likely to purchase again, and 11 times more likely to recommend a product or brand.

Consistency is key, especially for retail. But it’s also very important for B2B organizations too, especially those with a long sales cycle. Both kinds of organizations need to have a C-suite that is championing that vision of the customer experience and explaining why it’s so important to rally behind it, and how everyone fits in. Without that commitment, alignment, ownership, Customer Experience initiatives just won’t work.

CX is not a shiny new toy. You need to have a strategy and purpose for tackling CX. It can’t be done piecemeal, either, with the Contact Center pioneering an initiative, but then the experience dropping off once a customer contacts Sales or Marketing. Inconsistency is one of your greatest enemies to a great experience.

Don’t neglect the employee experience. Engaging your employees and communicating what your experience should look and feel like is crucial. They’re the ones who are making that experience a reality. It takes more than just surveys. You need to speak to your employees in person and get qualitative insight, backed up by hard metrics. Once you can take those insights, build them back into your experience, optimize your CX, then look for insights again, you can create a closed loop of constantly improving experience.

There are three kinds of metrics. Metrics based on perception, description, and outcome. Perception-based metrics are about your experience and how your customer understands it. They include metrics such as NPS, CES, and satisfaction. Description metrics are based on observable events, like FCR and AHT, and ensure you’re being efficient and effective. And outcome metrics are things like how many customers renewed their contracts or upgraded their package. Bottom line: you need all kinds of metrics to cover the entire scope of experience.

Experience is a mindset. It’s more than just a strategy or process. It’s who you are as a company, and as individuals. Customer centricity needs to start before a prospect even knows about you—it’s in your bones, your culture, and it’s how you truly create consistency. Maximizing Customer Lifetime Value is the goal of any CX effort, and the only way to do that is to have a mindset where you’re putting your customers first.

Start small. If you haven’t invested in CX at all, you can always begin by sending out an NPS survey and segmenting customers based on that score. From there, you can work in more complex layers of metrics and build up your understanding.

This is just a taste of the wide-ranging discussion on the podcast, so if this sounds relevant to your needs, be sure to have a listen.

To learn more about how Kustomer can help you deliver a more consistent and effective experience, request a demo with the form below!

Conversations with Kustomer Podcast: How Do You Go From Support to Experience? Featuring Jeremy Watkin and Nate Brown

What’s the difference between support, service, and experience—how do they inform one another, and what can you do to improve each? Our Director of Marketing Chen Barnea sat down with two CX luminaries to get their perspective on how to define customer experience, the best ways to understand and deliver it, and why companies should move towards an experience-first mindset.

Nate Brown is the Director of Customer Experience at UL EHSS, as well as the Founder of CX Accelerator. Jeremy Watkin is the Director of CX at FCR, and has more than 17 years of experience in the space. Together, they had an insightful discussion about the relationship between support and experience that you can listen to yourself above. While their chat with Chen covered a lot of ground, but we’ve picked some of the highlights for you below:

What is the difference between customer support and customer experience?

Nate shared a great quote to help explain the fundamental difference between these two concepts:

“Customer service starts where customer experience fails.”

So you can view customer service a the reactive response to a point in the journey reaches out to resolve an issue.

Therefore customer experience is more of a designed element that’s meant to prevent that service interaction in the first place.

Jeremy noted that some of the confusion around the distinction comes from a recent trend. “A lot of companies have started calling their service teams CX teams, which is a little clichéd—there are so many other pieces at work in the customer experience. I appreciate the sentiment that support teams need to have a role in the customer experience, but they aren’t the entire experience itself.”

Why is the customer experience mindset becoming more prominent?

According to Jeremy, the reason is simple: good CX is good business. “Customers love having their issues solved, but they’d love it even more if the issue they had never happened in the first place. I think that’s ultimately what’s driving the transition.”

Customers are fed up, and are finally asking for the experiences they’ve always deserved, as Nate describes: “This transition is fueled by customer frustration. People are waking up and realizing that they don’t need to spend three hours on the phone with customer service to get the experience they should have had from the beginning.”

Combined with new companies that are changing the game and raising the bar by reimagining the customer experience, every business has to look to deliver a more holistic, impactful experience instead of baseline support.

How can CX leaders help bring about these changes in their organizations?

As with so many other initiatives, change has to start from within: “The only way is by starting with the employee experience.” Said Nate, “Employees mirror that experience they have internally with the customer. Improve the internal culture, and the external experience will improve as well, as agents will naturally bring that experience and excitement and project it outwards.”

Jeremy agreed, highlighting Voice of the Customer initiatives as an example. “I think it has a snowball effect too. When it comes to VoC, frontline agents have a channel to share frustrations. As companies start to listen to that and put it into practice, you naturally see employees become more engaged and excited about improving CX.”

What technologies are the most important for improving your experience?

There is no shortage of technologies meant to help improve CX, but the right one will accomplish the right goals. As Nate described, “If your agents have bad tools and no visibility into the journey because it’s all divided between different toolsets, it leads to frustration, and that will come through to the customer. Conversely, If you have good tools that enable the employee to do their job well, then that positive experience will be passed on to them instead.”

How do you measure agents as you make this shift?

Every CX metric can help give you an idea of the effectiveness of your experience, but simply measuring is not enough. “What about Average Handle Time?” Asked Jeremy, “Sometimes you actually want your AHT to go up because you’re trying to deliver a more personal experience. For metrics, the important thing is WHY it’s going up or down.”

This is just a taste of the wide-ranging discussion on the podcast, so if this sounds relevant to your needs, be sure to have a listen. If you’re looking to expand your horizon beyond your organization and broaden your perspective on CX, definitely consider signing up for CX Accelerator as well.

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